Do's and Don'ts of Summer Trail Cameras Part #2

DON’T - check too often

Mack from Hang'Em Outfitters is disciplined with his summer trail camera use. Mack from Hang'Em Outfitters is disciplined with his summer trail camera use.

Patience is a virtue, and it’s important to not check a trail camera too often. Remember every time we step into the woods, we’re risking a bad encounter for that animal. Set a regular date like every other week or every month and stick to it. Find out how long the batteries last, how many images the card holds, and maximize the life of both of them. Another option is to invest in a camera that can e-mail images to a cell phone or computer. This is the stealthiest way to go, only requiring human interaction to install and change batteries. Most of these cameras also require a monthly service agreement. Some cameras now will allow the hunter to download images from a few hundred yards away. These cameras are much less invasive than traditional ones as well.

 

DO - use good batteries

There’s not much worse that tending a trail camera that’s been dead for a while and hasn’t taken a recent picture in weeks. Be sure to invest in good batteries and they are worth their weight in gold. Like we mentioned earlier, learn their expected life with a particular camera and maximize it. Lithium batteries seem to do well for us.

 

If this beautiful buck gets shot this fall, we'll share who sent us this picture Until then... our lips are sealed. If this beautiful buck gets shot this fall, we'll share who sent us this picture Until then... our lips are sealed.

DON’T - brag

The time to show off pictures of a wall hanger is when he is dead in the back of your truck. Don’t e-mail every cool picture that is taken because it will eventually fall into the hands of someone who isn't honest. A sure fire way to get a giant buck or bull poached is by telling everyone in the county about it. Remember, the picture to share is the one where you’re holding his antlers.

 

DO- get off the beaten path

Many hunters, especially on public or well used lands will hang cameras on well-worn paths in hopes of catching a glimpse of that wary old buck or bull. We all know many people who have had cameras and other gear stolen. Once again, summer scouting is about taking inventory. Get away from other hunters, set up bait of some sort, and bring the animals to your camera. Also stay away from property lines. Sometimes well meaning landowners remove cameras that they feel are trespassing... even when they are not. If the property line is a bit blurry... then stay away.

 

DON’T- cut corners

Quite often the difference between a successful hunter and a hungry one is the amount of effort they put forth ahead of time. Many hunters use the word “someday” like a magical moment, claiming that someday they’ll... In reality, someday is now! Haul in water if necessary to keep a drinker open, bring back mineral or corn where legal. Go all out and don’t be lazy.

 

DO - have fun and send us pictures!

Hunting is supposed to be fun! Enjoy your summer trail camera program. If it becomes too stressful, or isn’t possible to use without bumping the animals, then don’t do it. As with any other piece of hunting gear left in the woods, be sure to lock it tight to the tree and remember where the keys are located! If you get any cool pictures, be sure to send them to us - preferably with you holding the antlers!

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